What rhythm, timbre, accent, and tone do for the spoken word, typographic design does for words printed on a page or displayed on a screen. Much as an …
ann kjellberg
Disneyland’s July 17, 1955 opening-day reviews were excoriating. H.W. Mooring of the Los Angeles Tidings wrote, “Walt’s dream is a nightmare. I attende…
ann kjellberg
Writing and reading notoriously take place in solitude, and are often kind to people who welcome it, making public recognition of writing a sometimes a…
ann kjellberg
We thought readers might enjoy poet Mark Wunderlich’s presentation of the National Book Award in poetry last Wednesday. The great wit Max Beerbohm wrot…
ann kjellberg
“Will you join me,” the fifteen-year-old Elizabeth Bishop asked a close friend, “in wading in the mud of the celestial gardens?” Modern literary biogra…
ann kjellberg
The writing of George Garrett (1929–2008), prolific and protean poet, novelist, raconteur, gadfly, and more, is probably not much remembered now, nor d…
ann kjellberg
I have pondered a great deal over a conversation I took part in a number of years ago in one of the offices of New York University. I had lived away fr…
ann kjellberg
In a way the place of an English-language bookstore in a non-English-speaking country is a kind of paradigm for the lot of bookstores everywhere. A sho…
ann kjellberg
Despite its swaggering title and militant red and black cover, Caleb Crain’s Overthrow does not document a revolution. On the contrary, it warns of the…
ann kjellberg
“In the chowder are warmed the essences of Chile,” Pablo Neruda Every writer who tells stories through food satisfies a particular appetite in a reader…
ann kjellberg
Gabriel García Márquez was for us, standard young Latin American literati, some sort of force of nature. He was like China: too big, too rich, too opaq…
ann kjellberg
Twisting fairy stories has been a feminist stratagem ever since Anne Sexton wrote her sequence of barbed, hurt poems, Transformations, back in 1971; Ma…
ann kjellberg