John Ruskin famously disdained those who would waste time socializing, when staying home and reading great literature is so much the wiser use of our t…
Ann Kjellberg
Ann Kjellberg, editor Bookselling in a virtual world and how we hear voices that are not big and loud.
Ann Kjellberg
Ann Kjellberg, editor How do booksellers put new ideas in our path under lockdown and plan for a season of isolation and unknowns?
Ann Kjellberg
“I’m beginning to know myself,” Fernando Pessoa wrote. “I don’t exist.” Or perhaps it was one of his “heteronyms” who said this. There were at least se…
Ann Kjellberg
Teachout starts her new book about the crushing weight of monopoly on American economic and political life in the heartland, showing rural and urban Am…
Ann Kjellberg
Grafton’s Inky Fingers reveals the messy, painstaking, and even back-breaking work behind pre-modern intellectual innovations 
Ann Kjellberg
Perversely, I ask you to consider the poetry of Wallace Stevens. A white man of inheritance and marked privilege—the education and attainments of the I…
Ann Kjellberg
In a recent interview, Lucy Ellmann, author of Ducks, Newburyport, said “fiction is like a rock that sits there in your way. How do you break a rock? Y…
Ann Kjellberg
The subtitle of Scot McKnight‘s book—“a gospel of peace in the midst of empire”—begs the question: Can there be a gospel of peace in the face of the vi…
Ann Kjellberg
Isolation is a terrible punishment, we all know. Circumstances when people have been hidden away include, at the extreme end, being dropped down a well…
Ann Kjellberg
While cats are serious business in children’s literature, “serious” literature hasn’t had much truck with them. A whole other order of phenomenon is Cz…
Ann Kjellberg
In the years since “Ready to Die” by Notorious B.I.G. first appeared, Biggie’s old neighborhood has been gentrified, hip-hop has been embraced by a mai…
Ann Kjellberg